In Palm Springs pineapple televisions meet extra terrestrial celestial harmonics…

Anna’s furniture is an exuberant, playful, joyful, celebration of life.
These pieces have a natural elegance, subtle lines and proportions. Anna marries a functional object with ornamentation. She experiments by combining traditional techniques with new materials and technologies.

The pieces are sustainable due to the quality of the designs, the Italian craftsmanship and materials selected. These pieces are constructed to last and be passed down as heir looms. Since the work is related to many classical periods embedded in new forms, they can exist in different spaces and relate to all periods past and present.

Whilst they are contemporary, modern pieces of furniture, they are designed with the quality of a museum or art gallery piece. As one owns a piece of this work like one owns a piece of antiquity or art work, there is no difference.

Colours inspired by Renaissance paintings and palaces, travelling, living and dreaming, are selected to work together on all kinds of surfaces and in different kinds of light: daylight, shade and artificial lighting. It is this kind of meticulous attention to detail that forms the basis of Anna’s work.

The objects bring with them fragments of history, mixed with new ideas, for present and future living. The work can sit in formal and ancient interiors, palaces, country houses or contemporary apartments. The pieces tell stories with the formality of traditional furniture but integrate with any style since they are born out of so many varied influences.

(Sally- Sarah Titterrington 2019 )

Anna Gili’s furniture design is based on a search for a particular character and expression, which Anna applies to the objects that surround us, this could be for: vases, carpets, furniture, masks or other objects. The two “Bea” sideboards of inlaid wood are the result from a research into 3D Decor design, (1985). These designs were created using 3D technology in the early pioneering stages of 3D printing whereby traditional inlay techniques combined with computer technology are used to create these unique objects.

The “Tonda” armchair has not been created to solve the problem of sitting, rather it is meta-project, on the question of sitting. It is a form that intends to evoke the joy and memory of sitting on the lap of one’s mother.

The terracotta tables “TAMBU & TON TON”, are made in the archaic material of terracotta, with pure and simple lines to suggest ethnic origins.

In contrast the trio of furniture from the brand “ANIMALOVE”, is based on zoo-semiotics research into the animal kingdom.

The cupboard “A VISO APERTO”, is linked to the theme of human portraiture, a topic that Anna continues to explore throughout her work, starting in the performance “Painted People” – Alchimia Museum 1986).

The “FIGURE PRESENTI” is an installation made up of tables, chairs, lamps, masks and carpets for Memphis and belongs to “contemporary classicism”. “….they are figures that affirm their exterior and interior presence through easily discernible outlines. They come across as thoughts that are structured to express their responsibility as “still” things …”

(A. Mendini, Figures Presenti-Memphis catalogue).

In Palm Springs pineapple televisions meet extra terrestrial celestial harmonics…

Anna’s furniture is an exuberant, playful, joyful, celebration of life.
These pieces have a natural elegance, subtle lines and proportions. Anna marries a functional object with ornamentation. She experiments by combining traditional techniques with new materials and technologies.

The pieces are sustainable due to the quality of the designs, the Italian craftsmanship and materials selected. These pieces are constructed to last and be passed down as heir looms. Since the work is related to many classical periods embedded in new forms, they can exist in different spaces and relate to all periods past and present.

Whilst they are contemporary, modern pieces of furniture, they are designed with the quality of a museum or art gallery piece. As one owns a piece of this work like one owns a piece of antiquity or art work, there is no difference.

Colours inspired by Renaissance paintings and palaces, travelling, living and dreaming, are selected to work together on all kinds of surfaces and in different kinds of light: daylight, shade and artificial lighting. It is this kind of meticulous attention to detail that forms the basis of Anna’s work.

The objects bring with them fragments of history, mixed with new ideas, for present and future living. The work can sit in formal and ancient interiors, palaces, country houses or contemporary apartments. The pieces tell stories with the formality of traditional furniture but integrate with any style since they are born out of so many varied influences.

 

(Sally- Sarah Titterrington 2019 )

Anna Gili’s furniture design is based on a search for a particular character and expression, which Anna applies to the objects that surround us, this could be for: vases, carpets, furniture, masks or other objects. The two “Bea” sideboards of inlaid wood are the result from a research into 3D Decor design, (1985). These designs were created using 3D technology in the early pioneering stages of 3D printing whereby traditional inlay techniques combined with computer technology are used to create these unique objects.

The “Tonda” armchair has not been created to solve the problem of sitting, rather it is meta-project, on the question of sitting. It is a form that intends to evoke the joy and memory of sitting on the lap of one’s mother.

The terracotta tables “TAMBU & TON TON”, are made in the archaic material of terracotta, with pure and simple lines to suggest ethnic origins.

In contrast the trio of furniture from the brand “ANIMALOVE”, is based on zoo-semiotics research into the animal kingdom.

The cupboard “A VISO APERTO”, is linked to the theme of human portraiture, a topic that Anna continues to explore throughout her work, starting in the performance “Painted People” – Alchimia Museum 1986).

The “FIGURE PRESENTI” is an installation made up of tables, chairs, lamps, masks and carpets for Memphis and belongs to “contemporary classicism”. “….they are figures that affirm their exterior and interior presence through easily discernible outlines. They come across as thoughts that are structured to express their responsibility as “still” things …”

(A. Mendini, Figures Presenti-Memphis catalogue).